Join us in Supporting Legislation that will Protect Pets

As temperatures continue to rise in Michigan, we are reminded of the danger in leaving dogs in cars. On an 85-degree day, the temperature inside a car can rise to more than 100 degrees in under 10 minutes, even if the sky is cloudy and the windows are cracked. As a result, dogs can suffer heat-related illnesses and may die before help has a chance to arrive.

Unfortunately, Michigan does not currently protect those who directly intervene if they see a dog suffering in a hot car. House Bill 4092 would give immunity from criminal prosecution to those who forcibly enter a vehicle to rescue an animal. Many states have such laws, but we are not yet one of them. We encourage members of the community to contact your state representative and urge them to support this legislation. This bill can not only save lives, but protect those who stand up to help.

The Detroit Zoological Society recently hosted our bi-annual Meet Your Best Friend at the Zoo, the nation’s largest off-site animal adoption event, in partnership with the Michigan Humane Society. Our staff shared with attendees the dangers of leaving pets in cars and thankfully, most of them were already aware of this and the importance of calling the police if they witness this occurring. Many wanted to know how else they could help, and we provided postcards and contact information for each of their state representatives, as well as sample messaging to support House Bill 4092. We collected and distributed 165 postcards from this event.

The DZS’s Berman Academy for Humane Education exists to help people help animals. One way we do this is by providing opportunities for community members to take action in ways that have positive, lasting impacts on animals.

You can look up your state representative and their contact information here. We also encourage you to consider writing to your elected officials about other legislation that affects animals – you can find an updated list of Michigan and federal legislation here.

– Dr. Stephen Vrla is the curator of humane education for the Detroit Zoological Society and oversees the Berman Academy for Humane Education.

Kindergartners Detail Good “Zoo Manners” for Guests

It is important for young people to know their voice matters – even as young as 5 years old. At this age, they are at an important developmental stage as they develop self-awareness, are reflective of their own emotions, and begin to recognize emotions in others. It’s an important time to build empathy skills and reverence towards all living beings.

The Detroit Zoological Society received a note from the kindergarten teachers at Bemis Elementary in Troy as they were preparing for a trip to the Detroit Zoo. The teachers were wrapping up a unit on persuasive writing with their students and wanted to provide an authentic writing assignment that would combine literacy skills with their upcoming trip, so they asked their students to brainstorm visitor behaviors that can have a positive or negative impact on the environment and the well-being of the animals at the Zoo.

The class compiled a list of behaviors that could negatively impact animals, including tapping on the glass of habitats in the Holden Reptile Conservation Center or the National Amphibian Conservation Center, not properly disposing of recycling and trash, feeding or chasing peafowl, and straying from public paths. Each student chose a topic and wrote a letter, drew a poster or crafted a petition to persuade all visitors to take care of the Zoo.

Once the letters, petitions and posters were complete, the students recorded a short video sharing why they chose their topic and showcasing their final pieces. They brought all of their work with them when they visited the Zoo. Each of their petitions was read, their drawings admired and their delightful phonetic spelling was decoded.

In addition to practicing persuasive writing skills, the students arrived ready to spend the day enjoying the habitats while acting as ambassadors for the Zoo. The teachers’ mentorship was instrumental in this process. They provided a supportive environment that the students could learn and grow in, ultimately empowering the students to take action.

The Detroit Zoological Society celebrates all young people working towards a better future for all living beings. If you know of a young person who is making a positive difference in their community, we encourage you to nominate them for the Detroit Zoological Society Humane Youth Award to recognize their work. Nominations are open through August 1, 2019. Learn more and submit a nomination here.

– Claire Lannoye Hall is a curator of education for the Detroit Zoological Society.