Free Virtual Zoo Camp Has Arrived — Enjoy at Your Own Pace

Virtual Zoo Camp is Calling!

From the stellar Detroit Zoological Society education team that brought you Virtual Vitamin Z lessons during a pandemic, comes Summer Virtual Ventures, free digital programming that gives you the opportunity to enjoy a camp experience from the comfort of your own home.

Summer Virtual Ventures includes exciting animal-related content, expert interviews, hands-on activities and much more.

New virtual camps will be posted weekly through the end of August 2020.

Check out a few of the Summer Virtual Ventures below:

PENGUIN CONSERVATION CHALLENGES
In this icy adventure, learners will take on the role of conservation field workers researching penguins in Antarctica and the Falkland Islands. You’ll work to find creative solutions to the many challenges that accompany fieldwork. Shadow animal care staff and get an exclusive look at what it is like to care for the penguins at the Detroit Zoo.

Adventure Now

AMAZON RAINFOREST CONSERVATION
Wildlife conservationists and scientists need your help! Working in the Amazon rainforest comes with many challenges. Try to solve them while learning more about the animals who live in the rainforest.

Adventure Now

Male Chimpanzee Born at Detroit Zoo in January Successfully Unites with Adoptive Mom

Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week for five months (and during a pandemic). 

That’s how long the Detroit Zoological Society (DZS) animal care staff hand-reared a male chimpanzee born in early January before they successfully transitioned his care to an adoptive chimpanzee mom in June.

“It’s a story of great dedication,” said Scott Carter, chief life sciences officer for the Detroit Zoological Society. “Nights, weekends and through a pandemic — Detroit Zoo primate staff cared for the baby chimpanzee around the clock. And now it’s a very heartwarming story of a baby who has found a devoted, adoptive chimp mom and family.” 

Zane was born on January 7, 2020, to Chiana, 26, who is also the mother of 6-year-old Zuhura. But soon after Zane’s birth, Chiana became very ill and was unable to care for her newborn. Chiana was treated by veterinarians and recovered, but after she recovered, she showed no interest in caring for her little son. The Detroit Zoo’s primate care staff stepped in to give Zane 24-hour care, which included carrying him constantly, as a mother chimp would, and teaching him to take milk from a bottle. 

Over the five months, Zane lived in the Great Apes of Harambee building instead of a nursery so he could be around the other chimpanzees. During this time, the chimpanzees could see him up close through the mesh of their enclosure. 

“Every day, the other chimpanzees could see us caring for him,” said Carter. “He was always near the other chimps even though they physically could not be together.” 

To prepare Zane for life with the other chimpanzees, the Detroit Zoological Society consulted with the Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ Chimpanzee Species Survival Plan and other zoos that have integrated rejected infants into social groups. The carefully planned process began with observing potential surrogate moms in the Detroit Zoo’s 11-member chimpanzee troop and their responses to Zane. Mother-daughter duo Trixi, 50, and Tanya, 29, both adult females in the troop, showed interest almost immediately.

Photo by Roy Lewis.

“Trixi is a confident and high-ranking matriarch,” said Carter. “She was a wonderful mother to her daughter Tanya, and when we were considering who could be the best new mother for Zane, she stood out. She was very interested in being near him whenever she could and seemed quite taken with him.”  

From their first physical interaction, it was clear that 5-month-old Zane had found his new adoptive family. 

“Zane approached and hugged Trixi and Tanya the minute he had the chance,” said Carter. “Trixi is Zane’s primary caregiver, while Tanya, who has never had a baby of her own, loves playing with Zane, napping with him, and carrying him for short periods.”

Photo by Roy Lewis.

Carter added, “We’re incredibly proud of our devoted primate staff for doing such an amazing job of caring for Zane and preparing him and his new adoptive family to thrive together.”

Baby Zane is now living with the troop at the Great Apes of Harambee at the Detroit Zoo. The chimpanzees who live at the Detroit Zoo have a fission-fusion dynamic, which means they have the freedom to choose who they want to spend their time with at any given moment. As with all animals at the Detroit Zoo, they also have the choice to go where they please in the habitat, so Zane might not always be visible. The multi-acre indoor-outdoor Great Apes of Harambee habitat is home to 12 chimpanzees.

Photo by Jennifer Harte.

Zane’s birth is the result of a recommendation from the Association of Zoos & Aquariums’ Chimpanzee Species Survival Plan, a cooperative population management and conservation program that helps ensure the sustainability of healthy, genetically diverse and demographically strong captive animal populations. Chimpanzees are listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature due to habitat loss, fragmented populations and illegal wildlife trafficking.

Detroit Zoological Society Delivers Free Virtual Learning Programs During Pandemic

When we made the decision to temporarily close the Detroit Zoo and Belle Isle Nature Center in mid-March due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we knew we had to find a way to stay connected with our wonderful community. The Detroit Zoological Society (DZS) education team took on the challenge, pivoting to deliver virtual programs.

Since mid-March, our team has produced more than 150 free virtual learning programs to help students, families and lifelong learners continue to explore wildlife conservation, animal welfare, environmental sustainability and humane education.

While we continue to hold lessons on Facebook Live, you can also find the videos on our Virtual Vitamin Z Youtube channel. We also have a new online tool that allows you to search for lessons, including activities, based on grade levels and subjects.

Even though we have since reopened the Detroit Zoo to visitors by reservation, we are still working to reach more of our community through digital means. The DZS education team is also working on Summer Virtual Ventures and producing longer lesson plans for people throughout Michigan.

Check out a sample of some of the team’s virtual learning programs below:

Learn about Partula nodosa snails and how the Detroit Zoological Society brought them back from the brink of extinction. 

Discover what rhinos Jasiri and Tamba were up to during the shutdown.

Visit the penguins in the Penguinarium and learn how water plays a critical role in their well-being.
Did you hear? The black-crowned night herons that roost at the Detroit Zoo are back.
Join David for a Wildlife Adventure Story about zebras. 
Sandy has a sneak peek of our DZS summer programming.

Thank you for all of your support and encouragement. We hope to continue to provide enriching lessons for our community and beyond. 

Welcome Back to Your Zoo — A Note from Ron Kagan


There’s nothing quite like taking a leisurely walk around the Detroit Zoo to admire the gardens, the sunshine and the incredible animals who live here.

But now the experience is better — because the experience has you.

The Detroit Zoological Society team has been working around the clock to make sure all of our guests have a safe and enjoyable visit. After all, you deserve a little relaxation, a chance to explore and reconnect with loved ones.

RESERVATIONS

In addition to adding new time and date slots for members each day, we have now opened up reservations on our website to the general public for visits starting Friday. Check back often, as new slots will open up regularly!

SAFETY GUIDELINES

As we monitor the first few days of our reopening, we are also reviewing our guidelines. We will continue to revise our safety guidelines as warranted. You can visit detroitzoo.org/health to learn more before planning your visit.

NEW ARRIVALS

Of course, spring is always an exciting time to introduce you to new arrivals at the Detroit Zoo. We are thrilled to share the news of the birth of a Japanese macaque. The baby was born on June 3 to parents Carmen and Haru. As you can see, big sister Hana seems very interested in her new sibling.

PT new baby

We are also happy to see the arrival of new prairie dog pups, and they are quite an adorable sight as they scurry in and out of their underground tunnels.

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Also of note is the successful breeding of more than 170 dusky gopher frogs at the Zoo’s National Amphibian Conservation Center. In an effort to help restore this critically endangered amphibian, the frogs will be released into the wild in Mississippi this week.

Gopher frog

We (and our reservations system) have been overwhelmed by your support, and we remain grateful for all of your thoughtful feedback and engagement.

Welcome back to your Zoo.

I hope to see you during your next visit,

Ron Kagan
Executive Director and CEO
Detroit Zoological Society

We’re Eagerly Getting Ready for Your Visit – A Note from Ron Kagan

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The Detroit Zoological Society (DZS) is ready for you to rediscover the peaceful, safe and special Zoo you love, potentially as early as Monday, June 8.

While we’re still awaiting clarification on whether the Detroit Zoo is permitted to reopen on that day, we want you to know that your Zoo experience will be a little different from how it was pre-COVID-19. What isn’t these days?! But that just means we’re doing our job well to keep you safe. Initially, we will be limiting the capacity of guests within the Detroit Zoo. You might be pleased to know that members will have the first few days of reopening to themselves.

Masks are in this year, so wear yours. Every person who enters our grounds will be expected to accept and support the shared responsibility of keeping themselves, our guests, and staff (and the animals who live here, too!) safe. We all have a very important part to play.

The DZS team is doing daily walkthroughs of the grounds, making sure nothing is missed in our new safety protocols. Expect a detailed step-by-step guide on the new Detroit Zoo experience in the days ahead. There are some fun new twists!

As mentioned in a previous message, the DZS has extended all existing memberships by two months. The members’ annual meeting has been postponed. We don’t yet have a new date, but we plan to relay that information soon. Importantly, if you’d like to help support the DZS, please consider renewing your membership here or giving a gift to help with Zoo operations as we’ve lost millions in revenue over the past two months. Many of you have sent support over the past weeks. We are so appreciative!

In an effort to reduce possible risks to children in our community and because we cannot afford to properly staff due to millions in lost revenue, the Detroit Zoological Society has had to cancel this year’s in-person Safari Camps. The DZS education department will continue to provide enriching virtual content to help children continue to learn and grow this summer. If you’ve already signed your child up to participate in this year’s Safari Camps, you can choose to move your reservation to next year, donate your reservation to the DZS or get a full refund. Contact Customer Care at info@dzs.org for more information. We appreciate your understanding and look forward to welcoming kids back to camp soon!

In the meantime, if you are looking to bring a slice of the Zoo to you, the Zoofari Market has gone digital! Explore our online shop to find a great selection of eco-friendly products, stylish apparel, unique souvenir keepsakes and new animal-inspired face masks.

I know we’re all craving to reconnect, both with each other and with nature, and the Detroit Zoological Society is looking forward to providing the community with an outdoor reprieve from the stress of the past few months.

See you soon,

Ron Kagan
Executive Director and CEO
Detroit Zoological Society