Greenprint: Trash from Great Lakes Turned into Art at Detroit Zoo

The Detroit Zoological Society (DZS) recently partnered with ArtRoad Nonprofit, an organization that provides art-based activities, instruction and supplies to elementary schools in southeastern Michigan that are lacking in art programs.

In addition to the incredible educational opportunities this organization shares with hundreds of students annually, they also reuse donated items within their art projects in order to reduce waste. This aspect of the organization especially appeals to us as we continue with our Greenprint initiatives and award-winning efforts to create a more sustainable future.

I recently had the opportunity to volunteer in an ArtRoad classroom, where we worked with students on repurposing various items into works of art. The students greeted me with a warm welcome, and knowing that I work at the Detroit Zoo, created penguin art using recycled vinyl for the birds’ feet.

In turn, I provided the students with journals that DZS staff created using recycled millage signs. We hope these journals will help the budding artists capture their imaginations on paper.

Recently, ArtRoad collaborated with the Alliance for the Great Lakes to collect recyclable materials and debris from the shorelines of Lake Michigan. Using these items, more than 150 elementary school students spent two months creating five fish sculptures, one for each of the five Great Lakes. This effort aims to bring awareness about the effects plastic pollution has on freshwater ecosystems.

We are excited to be able to share this educational and impactful project with Detroit Zoo visitors – these fish sculptures will be on display April 22-July 9. It’s only fitting that the art exhibition will be unveiled during GreenFest, our Earth Day celebration, and will be on display during Sunset at the Zoo, our annual fundraising gala that carries a theme this year of “Green is the New Black”, celebrating our groundbreaking efforts in sustainability.

Our recent initiatives include discontinuing the sale of bottled water on Zoo grounds – keeping 60,000 plastic bottles out of the waste stream annually – and building an anaerobic digester which will convert more than 500 tons of animal manure annually into methane-rich gas to power the Zoo’s animal hospital.

Be sure to check out the ArtRoad exhibition on your next visit to the Detroit Zoo!

– Rachel Handbury is the manager of sustainability for the Detroit Zoological Society and oversees the Greenprint initiatives.

Education: Inuit Artwork in the Arctic Ring of Life

The Detroit Zoological Society’s permanent art collection focuses on making people think about their relationship with animals. Throughout history, humans have always been intrinsically linked with animals in many ways. This could be through worshipping animals, hunting them (both as a food source and as a culturally significant event), anthropomorphizing them, and more.

Dancing Walrus - Adamie Alariaq

Dancing Walrus – Adamie Alariaq

The language of art is universal; it is the language that can bind cultures together and can preserve them. It is the language that can strengthen a multi-cultural society without weakening or emboldening any one of its members. The works of art we have in our collection are designed to show the human relationships and interactions with animals in several cultures.

During the upcoming Wild Winter event on Saturday, January 21, we will provide talks on the Inuit art that is displayed in the Arctic Ring of Life at 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

The Arctic Ring of Life houses most of our Inuit art collection, which demonstrates many of the different ways and styles that animals can be showcased in art. Art is used for many things in all cultures, including helping to explain the stories of a culture and support understanding of it. In Inuit culture, animals play a vital role, including in significant events and rituals. Due to this, every piece has a distinct, important and personal story that it illustrates.

Sleeping Ptarmigan - Pangnirtung

Sleeping Ptarmigan – Pangnirtung

Come to the Arctic Ring of Life this Saturday to hear more about the Inuit peoples and how art plays into their lives and to hear more detailed information on two pieces we are going to highlight.

– Sioux Trujillo is the curator of fine and performing arts for the Detroit Zoological Society.